Dec 16, 2014

On the Streets: LGBTQ Youth and Homelessness

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Dec 11, 2014

Unaccompanied and Unnoticed: Saving Our Homeless Youth

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Dec 2, 2014

Social media can reach homelessyouth; 46% of homelessyouth have daily internet access

A 2013 study of homeless youth found that 46% reported having daily access to the internet and 93% reported having access at least once a week. The majority of homeless youth surveyed accessed the internet from a social service agency (60%) or a library (54%). Importantly, another study found 75% of homeless youth use at least one social network

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Nov 19, 2014

 

Young homeless women are 5x more likely to experience multiple pregnancies than housed peers

Young homeless women are five times more likely to become pregnant and are far more likely to experience multiple pregnancies than young housed women due to the risk of sexual victimization and participation in survival sex. Becoming pregnant is also one of the primary reasons young women become homeless for they are forced to leave their family home

Smid, Marcela, Bourgois, P., and Auerswald, C. (2010) “The challenge of pregnancy among homeless youth: reclaiming a lost opportunity.” Journal of health care for the poor and underserved, 21(2): 140. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3037014/

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Nov 14, 2014

cahomelessyouth:

11- 37% of youth who age out of foster care experience homelessness

Many young people in foster care age out of the child welfare system without a safe and stable living situation. Researchers estimate the number of youth who age out of foster care and experience homelessness is between 11 and 37 percent. 25 to 50 percent of young adults exiting foster care face situations such as couch surfing, or doubling up, frequent evictions, and high mobility.

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Nov 6, 2014

Micky Bagwell at the Celebrating Success Breakfast!

Micky was honored by Safe Place for Youth at the Westside Shelter & Hunger Coalition’s Celebrating Success Breakfast on October 30, 2014. Micky was one of the four featured speakers, telling his story of transitioning off the streets and into stability. Here is Micky’s story.

Being homeless was the worst part of my life, so far. But it has made me the man I am today, which I would not trade for anything.

My thoughts on the homeless prior to last year were not the most flattering. I thought of them as a species different from myself: a species that sleeps on the street and has no idea where their next meal is coming from. How could a person allow themselves to fall to such depths? My opinion has now changed.

Looking back on it now, the ordeal seems to have lasted years. I was actually homeless for only five months, two of which were spent on the street. I learned more about myself in those five months than I did in my 22 prior years of life. 

I packed all of my items into a duffle bag and backpack and hopped on the bus. That day was so surreal. In packing all my belongings I made the ingenious decision to pack a pillow, but not a blanket (because the beach doesn’t get cold). I remember that first night like it was yesterday. I was walking OUTSIDE looking for a place to SLEEP. The location I picked was horrible. People were walking by, staring. I woke up around 3 A.M. sick as a dog, freezing because I had no blanket.

After that night my eyes were opened. I made the decision to get off the streets as soon as possible. I walked around looking for different jobs. I finally caught on with a construction company. Through hard work and dedication I was able to become a full-time employee. I saved my money and got an apartment. 

Now I’ve been promoted to Office Manager. I have an appreciation for life like never before. I learned to take nothing for granted, even a simple thing like sleeping in a bed. I will never forget my experience on the streets of Venice Beach.

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Nov 3, 2014

November is Runaway & Homeless Youth Month

November has been officially recognized as National Runaway & Homeless Youth Awareness Month by the United States Congress since 2007. It is also National Runaway Prevention Month.  

Each year more than 1.6 million children are homeless at some point in their lives, and that number is increasing. Along with losing their home, community, friends, and routines as well as their sense of stability and safety, many homeless youth are also victims of trauma. While trying to survive on the streets, youth are exposed to countless dangers, with an increased likelihood of substance abuse, early parenthood, impulsivity, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, and a vulnerability to being trafficked.

California has the second highest percentage in the country of unaccompanied minor homeless youth who are unsheltered at 79.2%.

Follow us on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook for more information about Runaway and Homeless Youth Month activities!

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Nov 3, 2014

cahomelessyouth:

Majority of runaway youth return home, others cycle in & out of homelessness

According to a study of runaway and homeless youth, while about 99% of homeless youth under the age of 18 eventually return home, approximately 380,000 remain away from home and 131,000 remain homeless longer than a month.

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Oct 31, 2014

Hilton Foundation Invests $12 Million to End Homelessness

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